AoC2 – Let’s call it Shirley

That title is an obscure Sesame Street reference to the sketch in the video below.

It’s always been one of my favorites. And the message holds true today. In work and in life, we need to turn to experts or those skilled where we are not in order to achieve our best possible outcomes. It’s about having a conversation, collaborating and forming a community. Which is the very message I have sought to drive in my contribution to Age of Conversation 2: Why don’t they get it?

There’s no better time than now to take up the challenge of being the evangelist for change in your organisation. You need to enable conversation, collaboration and community. It takes some nerve, though. You have to think different and act different. You need persistence. And you need to stand up to the naysayers and the resisters, putting your reputation and maybe your job on the line as you push through and introduce something stronger and better. Something exciting and engaging.

AoC2 goes on sale at 8:00AM, Wednesday, October 29 and will be available from Lulu.

aoc2.jpg

As with last year’s first edition, proceeds go to charity and everyone has given of their time freely to make this great cooperative effort happen. Here’s the contributor list:

Adrian Ho, Aki Spicer, Alex Henault, Amy Jussel, Andrew Odom, Andy Nulman, Andy Sernovitz, Andy Whitlock, Angela Maiers, Ann Handley, Anna Farmery, Armando Alves, Arun Rajagopal, Asi Sharabi, Becky Carroll, Becky McCray, Bernie Scheffler, Bill Gammell, Bob LeDrew, Brad Shorr, Brandon Murphy, Branislav Peric, Brent Dixon, Brett Macfarlane, Brian Reich, C.C. Chapman, Cam Beck, Casper Willer, Cathleen Rittereiser, Cathryn Hrudicka, Cedric Giorgi, Charles Sipe, Chris Kieff, Chris Cree, Chris Wilson, Christina Kerley (CK), C.B. Whittemore, Chris Brown, Connie Bensen, Connie Reece, Corentin Monot, Craig Wilson, Daniel Honigman, Dan Schawbel, Dan Sitter, Daria Radota Rasmussen, Darren Herman, Dave Davison, David Armano, David Berkowitz, David Koopmans, David Meerman Scott, David Petherick, David Reich, David Weinfeld, David Zinger, Deanna Gernert, Deborah Brown, Dennis Price, Derrick Kwa, Dino Demopoulos, Doug Haslam, Doug Meacham, Doug Mitchell, Douglas Hanna, Douglas Karr, Drew McLellan, Duane Brown, Dustin Jacobsen, Dylan Viner, Ed Brenegar, Ed Cotton, Efrain Mendicuti, Ellen Weber, Eric Peterson, Eric Nehrlich, Ernie Mosteller, Faris Yakob, Fernanda Romano, Francis Anderson, Gareth Kay, Gary Cohen, Gaurav Mishra, Gavin Heaton, Geert Desager, George Jenkins, G.L. Hoffman, Gianandrea Facchini, Gordon Whitehead, Greg Verdino, Gretel Going & Kathryn Fleming, Hillel Cooperman, Hugh Weber, J. Erik Potter, James Gordon-Macintosh, Jamey Shiels, Jasmin Tragas, Jason Oke, Jay Ehret, Jeanne Dininni, Jeff De Cagna, Jeff Gwynne & Todd Cabral, Jeff Noble, Jeff Wallace, Jennifer Warwick, Jenny Meade, Jeremy Fuksa, Jeremy Heilpern, Jeroen Verkroost, Jessica Hagy, Joanna Young, Joe Pulizzi, John Herrington, John Moore, John Rosen, John Todor, Jon Burg, Jon Swanson, Jonathan Trenn, Jordan Behan, Julie Fleischer, Justin Foster, Karl Turley, Kate Trgovac, Katie Chatfield, Katie Konrath, Kenny Lauer, Keri Willenborg, Kevin Jessop, Kristin Gorski, Lewis Green, Lois Kelly, Lori Magno, Louise Manning, Luc Debaisieux, Mario Vellandi, Mark Blair, Mark Earls, Mark Goren, Mark Hancock, Mark Lewis, Mark McGuinness, Matt Dickman, Matt J. McDonald, Matt Moore, Michael Karnjanaprakorn, Michelle Lamar, Mike Arauz, Mike McAllen, Mike Sansone, Mitch Joel, Neil Perkin, Nettie Hartsock, Nick Rice, Oleksandr Skorokhod, Ozgur Alaz, Paul Chaney, Paul Hebert, Paul Isakson, Paul McEnany, Paul Tedesco, Paul Williams, Pet Campbell, Pete Deutschman, Peter Corbett, Phil Gerbyshak, Phil Lewis, Phil Soden, Piet Wulleman, Rachel Steiner, Sreeraj Menon, Reginald Adkins, Richard Huntington, Rishi Desai, Robert Hruzek, Roberta Rosenberg, Robyn McMaster, Roger von Oech, Rohit Bhargava, Ron Shevlin, Ryan Barrett, Ryan Karpeles, Ryan Rasmussen, Sam Huleatt, Sandy Renshaw, Scott Goodson, Scott Monty, Scott Townsend, Scott White, Sean Howard, Sean Scott, Seni Thomas, Seth Gaffney, Shama Hyder, Sheila Scarborough, Sheryl Steadman, Simon Payn, Sonia Simone, Spike Jones, Stanley Johnson, Stephen Collins, Stephen Landau, Stephen Smith, Steve Bannister, Steve Hardy, Steve Portigal, Steve Roesler, Steven Verbruggen, Steve Woodruff, Sue Edworthy, Susan Bird, Susan Gunelius, Susan Heywood, Tammy Lenski, Terrell Meek, Thomas Clifford, Thomas Knoll, Tim Brunelle, Tim Connor, Tim Jackson, Tim Mannveille, Tim Tyler, Timothy Johnson, Tinu Abayomi-Paul, Toby Bloomberg, Todd Andrlik, Troy Rutter, Troy Worman, Uwe Hook, Valeria Maltoni, Vandana Ahuja, Vanessa DiMauro, Veronique Rabuteau, Wayne Buckhanan, William Azaroff, Yves Van Landeghem

That’s a lot of Shirley!

On a more personal note

Today, October 10 2008 is Blue Day for the Australian tech and social media community. We’re using it to raise awareness of anxiety and depression – issues that have affected many of us (including several people close to me). If you’re on Twitter, you’ll notice many of us have added a blue tinge to our avatars.

Globally, October 10 is World Mental Health Day. In Australia, organisations such as beyondblue are running Anxiety and Depression Awareness Month.

Awareness in your own life of the signs of declining mental health – both personally and in those around you – is critical. If you do nothing else today, do some reading about mental health awareness and management and then get outside in the fresh air and take a walk – exercise is a key factor in helping sufferers of mental health issues get well.

Standing for Social Media Club board

With 37 others, I am standing for the final slot on the Social Media Club Board.

SMC, is a great organisation, that has the support and involvement of the best people in social media and has the stated aim of:

…sharing best practices, establishing ethics and standards, and promoting media literacy around the emerging area of Social Media. This is the beginning of a global conversation about building an organization and a community where the many diverse groups of people who care about social media can come together to discover, connect, share, and learn.

The Board is a new initiative at SMC, aiming to gather the best minds together to help coordinate activities that will take SMC forward, addressing strategic and organisational goals. It’s taking what has been a very loose group and getting the (very voluntary) leaders of it to help each other and the community be better organised.

The role is voluntary, requiring a few hours of my time a month. The group I stand with (I hesitate to say against, as they are all people I respect highly) are all worthy of your vote, but I’m asking for it for a couple of reasons:

  • I’m really keen to be more involved with SMC. I’ve hovered at the edges for a while and think I can offer more
  • there aren’t enough Australians in the group, which is heavily skewed to the US and Europe. I think that the combined forces of me, Chris Saad and Des Walsh could work together to great effect and give the southern hemisphere crowd an active voice

So, totally your call. I won’t be offended if you don’t vote, or vote for someone else (the group is all worth voting for). But please do vote.

And hey, if you vote for me, let me know!

2020 Summit fails Australia on connectedness

My friend, Stilgherrian, has posted a scathing analysis of the final report of the 2020 Summit. He’s particularly disappointed with the Summit’s failure to address and take advantage of the power of the Internet to build connections between disparate communities and between the government and its constituency.

I couldn’t agree more.

My views on the ongoing failure of government at all levels in Australia to really engage online are public and published here. That said, the 2020 Summit was a real opportunity for the Rudd government to take positive steps in the way it connects people with service providers, policy-linked activity and each other. But, yet again, it looks like failure on a grand and blinkered scale.

I am deeply disappointed, but really not at all surprised. Once again the no idea, safe option has been taken without a gutsy leap forward.

Australian politicians and policy-makers really have no idea about how to use the Internet. Largely, they are stuck in 1995 and interested only in broadcast messages and policy brochureware.

They are certainly nowhere near what the Kiwis and Brits (amongst a lot of other online constituent-linked activity, No 10 has a Twitter account and uses it to talk with people!) are doing and light years from where someone like Texas Republican Representative, John Culberson is, using Twitter, podcasting, blogging and more to, as he says, put “We the People in every room in Washington”.

That’s not to say that things couldn’t be different here. They could. I personally know a significant number of smart people, working on the ground in Federal Government departments who get the power of the Internet and could facilitate powerful communication and connection efforts between their organisations and their constituencies if only they were allowed to…

socialmedian focussed news (and another Web 2.0 good guy)

Here’s another good news tale of a social application that reached out to me to see if I would be interested in taking a look at their offering. that service is socialmedian. Their CEO, Jason Goldberg, reached out and asked if I could take a deeper look at the site as I had tweeted that I was struggling to get value. He offered to help, and we’ve been chatting since.

sm-logo-home-1.gifsocialmedian are a very new (they fully admit to being in alpha and are very feature incomplete) social news gathering service that aims to provide you with targeted news based on broad (or potentially very focussed) subject matter groups you create yourself or join after others have defined them. For example, I created the eGovernment and Government 2.0 group and have joined others including Web 2.0, Enterprise 2.0 and Experience Design.

The service provides suggestions for news sources for your groups, allows you to add your own and provides a browser bookmarklet you can use to push stories to a particular group.

It’s early days yet, but it seems to be working pretty well as far as the core, news gathering functionality works. I’m hoping to work with Jason and the rest of the socialmedian crew on building out the social aspects of the site, as the way socialmedian works is ripe for rich sociality. In fact, socialmedian actively invite feature requests and seek to push new code live a few times a week. It’s very much development in the open.

Jason has given me a bunch of special invite codes that you can use to join socialmedian in you’re interested. Comment here to ask for one.

EDIT: Actually, let’s make it easy… Go to http://www.socialmedian.com/signup. Use the invite code acidlabs.

Have fun. Play. Give them feedback. Let me know how you go.

There are 50 instances of the code, so if you’re #51, sorry.

Age of Conversation 2 kicks off

After a couple of posts where I’ve expressed frustration about the seeming inability of business and government to take advantage of social media, I thought I’d close off the week (it’s Friday afternoon here) with something a little more positive. As many of you know, I’m one of the many co-authors for the new edition of Age of Conversation. The theme of the 2008 edition is Why don’t people get it? – kind of apt given my posts this week…
Picture of cool guy sitting upside down in funky chair
Anyway, under the terms of our AoC agreement, we’re only allowed to post a snippet of what our chapter contains, so here’s mine:

There’s no better time than now to take up the challenge of being the evangelist for change in your organisation… Talk is cheap. Being the driver for conversation, collaboration and community is a risk.

I absolutely recommend you get out there and be the intrapreneur for your organisation. Be the person who is willing to talk about and drive change. Be the squeaky wheel. But have fun while you’re doing it.

Have a good weekend! Oh, and while you’re at it, check out the blogs (and likely chapter snippets) from my fellow AoC co-authors:

Adam Crowe, Adrian Ho, Aki Spicer, Alex Henault, Amy Jussel, Andrew Odom, Andy Nulman, Andy Sernovitz, Andy Whitlock, Angela Maiers, Ann Handley, Anna Farmery, Armando Alves, Arun Rajagopal, Asi Sharabi, Becky Carroll, Becky McCray, Bernie Scheffler, Bill Gammell, Bob Carlton, Bob LeDrew, Brad Shorr, Bradley Spitzer, Brandon Murphy, Branislav Peric, Brent Dixon, Brett Macfarlane, Brian Reich, C.C. Chapman, Cam Beck, Casper Willer, Cathleen Rittereiser, Cathryn Hrudicka, Cedric Giorgi, Charles Sipe, Chris Kieff, Chris Cree, Chris Wilson, Christina Kerley (CK), C.B. Whittemore, Clay Parker Jones, Chris Brown, Colin McKay, Connie Bensen, Connie Reece, Cord Silverstein, Corentin Monot, Craig Wilson, Daniel Honigman, Dan Goldstein, Dan Schawbel, Dana VanDen Heuvel, Dan Sitter, Daria Radota Rasmussen, Darren Herman, Darryl Patterson, Dave Davison, Dave Origano, David Armano, David Bausola, David Berkowitz, David Brazeal, David Koopmans, David Meerman Scott, David Petherick, David Reich, David Weinfeld, David Zinger, Deanna Gernert, Deborah Brown, Dennis Price, Derrick Kwa, Dino Demopoulos, Doug Haslam, Doug Meacham, Doug Mitchell, Douglas Hanna, Douglas Karr, Drew McLellan, Duane Brown, Dustin Jacobsen, Dylan Viner, Ed Brenegar, Ed Cotton, Efrain Mendicuti, Ellen Weber, Emily Reed, Eric Peterson, Eric Nehrlich, Ernie Mosteller, Faris Yakob, Fernanda Romano, Francis Anderson, G. Kofi Annan, Gareth Kay, Gary Cohen, Gaurav Mishra, Gavin Heaton, Geert Desager, George Jenkins, G.L. Hoffman, Gianandrea Facchini, Gordon Whitehead, Graham Hill, Greg Verdino, Gretel Going & Kathryn Fleming, Hillel Cooperman, Hugh Weber, J. Erik Potter, J.C. Hutchins, James Gordon-Macintosh, Jamey Shiels, Jasmin Tragas, Jason Oke, Jay Ehret, Jeanne Dininni, Jeff De Cagna, Jeff Gwynne, Jeff Noble, Jeff Wallace, Jennifer Warwick, Jenny Meade, Jeremy Fuksa, Jeremy Heilpern, Jeremy Middleton, Jeroen Verkroost, Jessica Hagy, Joanna Young, Joe Pulizzi, Joe Talbott, John Herrington, John Jantsch, John Moore, John Rosen, John Todor, Jon Burg, Jon Swanson, Jonathan Trenn, Jordan Behan, Julie Fleischer, Justin Flowers, Justin Foster, Karl Turley, Kate Trgovac, Katie Chatfield, Katie Konrath, Kenny Lauer, Keri Willenborg, Kevin Jessop, Kris Hoet, Krishna De, Kristin Gorski, Laura Fitton, Laurence Helene Borei, Lewis Green, Lois Kelly, Lori Magno, Louise Barnes-Johnston, Louise Mangan, Louise Manning, Luc Debaisieux, Marcus Brown, Mario Vellandi, Mark Blair, Mark Earls, Mark Goren, Mark Hancock, Mark Lewis, Mark McGuinness, Mark McSpadden, Matt Dickman, Matt J. McDonald, Matt Moore, Michael Hawkins, Michael Karnjanaprakorn, Michelle Lamar, Mike Arauz, Mike McAllen, Mike Sansone, Mitch Joel, Monica Wright, Nathan Gilliatt, Nathan Snell, Neil Perkin, Nettie Hartsock, Nick Rice, Oleksandr Skorokhod, Ozgur Alaz, Paul Chaney, Paul Hebert, Paul Isakson, Paul Marobella, Paul McEnany, Paul Tedesco, Paul Williams, Pet Campbell, Pete Deutschman, Peter Corbett, Phil Gerbyshak, Phil Lewis, Phil Soden, Piet Wulleman, Rachel Steiner, Sreeraj Menon, Reginald Adkins, Richard Huntington, Rishi Desai, Beeker Northam, Rob Mortimer, Robert Hruzek, Roberta Rosenberg, Robyn McMaster, Roger von Oech, Rohit Bhargava, Ron Shevlin, Ryan Barrett, Ryan Karpeles, Ryan Rasmussen, Sam Huleatt, Sandy Renshaw, Scott Goodson, Scott Monty, Scott Townsend, Scott White, Sean Howard, Sean Scott, Seni Thomas, Seth Gaffney, Shama Hyder, Sheila Scarborough, Sheryl Steadman, Simon Payn, Sonia Simone, Spike Jones, Stanley Johnson, Stephen Collins, Stephen Cribbett, Stephen Landau, Stephen Smith, Steve Bannister, Steve Hardy, Steve Portigal, Steve Roesler, Steven Verbruggen, Steve Woodruff, Sue Edworthy, Susan Bird, Susan Gunelius, Susan Heywood, Tammy Lenski, Terrell Meek, Thomas Clifford, Thomas Knoll, Tiffany Kenyon, Tim Brunelle, Tim Buesing, Tim Connor, Tim Jackson, Tim Longhurst, Tim Mannveille, Tim Tyler, Timothy Johnson, Tinu Abayomi-Paul, Toby Bloomberg, Todd Andrlik, Troy Rutter, Troy Worman, Uwe Hook, Valeria Maltoni, Vandana Ahuja, Vanessa DiMauro, Veronique Rabuteau, Wayne Buckhanan, William Azaroff, Yves Van Landeghem

BarCamp Canberra #1 wrap

Welcome to BarCamp Canberra!!!

I think I speak for all of the Unorganisers when I say that BarCamp Canberra #1 was an unqualified success! We couldn’t be happier with the turnout, the quality of the talks, the feedback we’ve received and the enthusiasm to hold another BarCamp here in 2009.

Here are a few stats from the day:

  • in excess of 60 attendees (that’s an amazing turnout for somewhere as small as Canberra)
  • over 30 presentations on topics including web typography, GTD, open source, design and language
  • 156 photos and counting
  • several enthusiastic blog posts already – Stephen Dann, Gavin Jackson, Ruth Ellison and Steven Hanley
  • 30+ t-shirts handed out (if you were in the first 40 registrations, you were entitled to a t-shirt on the day, and if you were in the 41-55 bracket, there’s a t-shirt coming for you – make sure you let me know if you missed out)
  • a bunch of people introduced to the power of Twitter
  • 16 pizzas eaten
  • many Chupa-Chups and Arnotts Shapes consumed
  • 72 600ml bottles of water drunk
  • 32 people for the dinner afterwards
  • just two pieces of lost property – an Asus Eee PC power brick and a Nokia N95 belt pouch (if you own either of these, email me)

Personally, it was an incredibly fulfilling experience and I’m looking forward to being involved next time. As Canberra’s a small town, we’re probably a one BarCamp a year place. In the meantime, I’ll definitely be at any Australian BarCamp I can get to and might even try for the odd nearby international oneā€¦

My social network connection policy and that “friend” thing

The whole relationship spectrum in social networks is something that bugs me more than a little.

I live with it, as I’ve no choice if I want to use these tools, but most networks don’t adequately express the range of associations we have with people. The nuances of relationship that we express on a daily basis with people we work, play and live with aren’t nearly adequately expressed online. Something like the XFN microformat has more nuance, although not nearly enough. There needs to be more.

So, on Facebook, which is a pretty complex social network, you’re either my friend, or not. Nowhere near enough. I need (and want) to be able to express whether we’ve met, worked together, share interests, or are real-life friends and probably a bunch of other variants. I can sort of do this with groups, but it still feels inadequate.

LinkedIn is a slightly different story. The focus there is very different, and they have come a long way in terms of helping you to understand your own linkages, but not in helping others understand your linkages. So, for example, if someone wants to know how I know Andrew and Matthew, they need to do a little trawling. Again, inadequate to my thinking.

I want the expression of my relationships on complex social networks like Facebook and LinkedIn to be outward-facing, so that anyone who can see my social graph on these networks can also see adequately expressed nuance in those relationships. Are you a real-life friend, a colleague, a professional peer, my boss, my wife, my daughter, someone I went to school with?

Something like Twitter, on the other hand, is very simple. It’s largely a crowded room full of conversation – either I follow you, or I don’t, and the same goes for you and your crowd. I think for Twitter, that’s enough. YMMV.

So, to the real point of this post, how, when and why I might connect to you on a social network. Others have done similar pieces. I’m a particular fan of Shel Israel’s Twitter and Facebook policies. My policies are loosely based on his. So, here goes.

  1. If I don’t know who you are, I’m unlikely to connect to you. If we don’t know each other, please accompany your request with a short note explaining why you are trying to connect. If your explanation makes sense, I’ll probably connect. My email address is very public, so this shouldn’t be hard to do.
  2. If you are a brand, marketing flack, or company, I’m unlikely to connect with you. There are exceptions, but they are few.
  3. If you know several of my friends or colleagues, I’ll probably connect to you. I’ll check with them first, and I’d still like a note from you, but your chances are pretty good.
  4. If I know your work, blog or community I’ll probably connect to you. Again, a little explanation goes a long way, as do mutual connections.

Simple enough, I’d say.

CafePress – great customer service

cafepress_logo.gif

For BarCamp Canberra #1, we’ve used CafePress to print our t-shirts (we even have a store!). Sure, CafePress are US-based and we’re in Australia, but the opportunity to do a limited run, custom orders for early registrations and pricing pretty close to what we can get here is a compelling proposition.

252697985v2_240x240_Front_Color-Black.jpg

The t-shirt order arrived today, and they look good. Except the dark shirts. The black and charcoal grey shirts look crap. The blue from the logo, despite being provided in a form that was supposed to be fine for dark colors just doesn’t work.

So, first thing I did was fire off an email to their customer service department. I figured that since it is the middle of the day in Australia, I probably won’t get a reply until tomorrow. Not so! Under two hours later, CafePress have got back to me. I can keep the shirts and they’ll process a refund on all the problem shirts. I’ve created a new version for those wanting dark shirts. You can see it above this paragraph.

While it’ll be unlikely that folks who wanted a black t-shirt will get theirs on the 19th April, they will get a shirt, all thanks to great customer service from CafePress.

Well done!

275 voices. One idea.

Last year, Age of Conversation was a highly successful experiment in crowdsourced publishing. This year, the coordinators Drew McLennan and Gavin Heaton are at it again with the second edition; Age of Conversation: Why Don’t People Get It? I’m delighted to announce that I will be a contributor to the book.

iStock_000000329152Small.pngI hope that you’ll all read the book and enjoy the conversation being had there. Not to mention it supports a great cause – all proceeds from the book go to Variety, the Children’s Charity.

This time around there will be 275 (!!!) authors and we will be each providing a small piece for a chapter of the book. The complete author list is below and as you read through, you’ll notice there are a number of well known and highly regarded bloggers and commentators:

Adam Crowe, Adrian Ho, Aki Spicer, Alex Henault, Amy Jussel, Andrew Odom, Andy Nulman, Andy Sernovitz, Andy Whitlock, Angela Maiers, Ann Handley, Anna Farmery, Armando Alves, Arun Rajagopal, Asi Sharabi, Becky Carroll, Becky McCray, Bernie Scheffler, Bill Gammell, Bob Carlton, Bob LeDrew, Brad Shorr, Bradley Spitzer, Brandon Murphy, Branislav Peric, Brent Dixon, Brent Macfarlane, Brian Reich, C.C. Chapman, Cam Beck, Casper Willer, Cathleen Rittereiser, Cathryn Hrudicka, Cedric Giorgi, Charles Sipe, Chris Kieff, Chris Cree, Chris Wilson, Christina Kerley, C.B. Whittemore, Clay Parker Jones, Chris Brown, Colin McKay, Connie Bensen, Connie Reece, Cord Silverstein, Corentin Monot, Craig Wilson, Daniel Honigman, Dan Goldstein, Dan Schawbel, Dana VanDen Heuvel, Dan Sitter, Daria Radota Rasmussen, Darren Herman, Darryl Patterson, Dave Davison, Dave Origano, David Armano, David Bausola, David Berkowitz, David Brazeal, David Koopmans, David Meerman Scott, David Petherick, David Reich, David Weinfeld, David Zinger, Deanna Gernert, Deborah Brown, Dennis Price, Derrick Kwa, Dino Demopoulos, Doug Haslam, Doug Meacham, Doug Mitchell, Doug Hanna, Doug Karr, Drew McLellan, Duane Brown, Dustin Jacobsen, Dylan Viner, Ed Brenegar, Ed Cotton, Efrain Mendicuti, Ellen Weber, Emily Reed, Eric Peterson, Eric Nehrlich, Ernie Mosteller, Faris Yakob, Fernanda Romano, Francis Anderson, G. Kofi Annan, Gareth Kay, Gary Cohen, Gaurav Mishra, Gavin Heaton, Geert Desager, George Jenkins, Gi Hoffman, Gianandrea Facchini, Gordon Whitehead, Graham Reginald Hill, Greg Verdino, Gretel Going, Hillel Cooperman, Hugh Weber, J. Eric Potter, J.C. Hutchins, James Gordon-Macintosh, Jamey Shiels, Jasmin Tragas, Jason Oke, Jay Ehret, Jeanne Dininni, Jeff De Cagna, Jeff Gwynne, Jeff Noble, Jeff Wallace, Jennifer Warwick, Jenny Meade, Jeremy Fuksa, Jeremy Helipern, Jeremy Middleton, Jeroen Verkroost, Jessica Hagy, Joanna Young, Joe Pulizzi, Joe Talbott, John Herrington, John Jantsch, John Moore, John Rosen, John Todor, Jon Berg, Jon Swanson, Jonathan Trenn, Jordan Behan, Julie Fleischer, Justin Flowers, Justin Foster, Karl Turley, Kate Trgovac, Katie Chatfield, Katie Konrath, Kenny Lauer, Keri Willenborg, Kevin Jessop, Kris Hoet, Krishna De, Kristin Gorski, Laura Fitton, Laurence Helene Borei, Lewis Green, Lois Kelly, Lori Magno, Louise Barnes-Johnston, Louise Mangan, Louise Manning, Luc Debaisieux, Marcus Brown, Mario Vellandi, Mark Blair, Mark Earls, Mark Goren, Mark Hancock, Mark Lewis, Mark McGuinness, Mark McSpadden, Matt Dickman, Matt McDonald, Matt Moore, Michael Hawkins, Michael Karnjanaprakorn, Michelle Lamar, Mike Arauz, Mike McAllen, Mike Sansone, Mitch Joel, Monica Wright, Nathan Gilliatt, Nathan Snell, Neil Perkins, Nettie Hartsock, Nick Rice, Oleksandr Skorokhod, Ozgur Alaz, Paul Chaney, Paul Hebert, Paul Isakson, Paul Marobella, Paul McEnany, Paul Tedesco, Paul Williams, Pet Campbell, Pete Deutschman, Peter Corbett, Phil Gerbyshak, Phil Lewis, Phil Soden, Piet Wulleman, Rachel Steiner, Raj Menon, Reginald Adkins, Richard Huntington, Rishi Desai, R.J. Northam, Rob Mortimer, Robert Hruzek, Robyn McMaster, Roger von Oech, Rohit Bhargava, Ron Shevlin, Ryan Barrett, Ryan Karpeles, Ryan Rasmussen, Sam Huleatt, Sandy Renshaw, Scott Goodson, Scott Monty, Scott Townsend, Scott White, Sean Howard, Sean Scott, Seni Thomas, Seth Gaffney, Shama Hyder, Sheila Scarborough, Sheryl Steadman, Simon Payn, Sonia Simone, Spike Jones, Stanley Johnson, Stephen Collins, Stephen Cribbett, Stephen Landau, Stephen Smith, Steve Bannister, Steve Hardy, Steve Portigal, Steve Roesler, Steven Verbruggen, Steve Woodruff, Sue Edworthy, Susan Bird, Susan Gunelius, Susan Heywood, Tammy Lenski, Terrell Meek, Thomas Clifford, Thomas Knoll, Tiffany Kenyon, Tim Brunelle, Tim Buesing, Tim Connor, Tim Jackson, Tim Longhurst, Tim Mannveille, Tim Tyler, Timothy Johnson, Tinu Abayomi-Paul, Toby Bloomberg, Todd Andrlik, Troy Rutter, Troy Worman, Uwe Hook, Valeria Maltoni, Vandana Ahuja, Vanessa DiMauro, Veronique Rabuteau, Wayne Buckhanan, William Azaroff, Yves Van Landeghem